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Oct-17-2011

The return of freedom of expression to Indonesian society and the rapid infiltration of the market economy are the two main elements that have influenced media development in Indonesia since May 1998 in the reformasi era. The rejection of the former authoritarian rule of the Suharto regime by Indonesian society was profound and led to broad-based support for the concept of political and economic reform, in which the role of the state is to be minimized, and where free market forces are to preside over society, including the media. This is the socio-political climate in which the privatization of entire industries, including the media, is taking place. As a consequence, in the last decade since the end of Suharto’s centralized media regime, the media sector has simultaneously undergone a democratization process whilst expanding tremendously and giving way to increasing media corporatization. Meanwhile, digital technologies and converged platforms are not just making media more ubiquitous, but also offer tremendous opportunities to re-construct the mediascape in the post-Suharto Indonesia, especially in the political and cultural spheres. Against this backdrop, any discussion on media access and rights in Indonesia needs to be anchored.

Download the full report here: http://participatorymedia.lab.asu.edu/files/Lim_Media_Ford_2011.pdf

3 Responses so far.

  1. [...] p.s. my chapter here is a much shorter version of @crossroads: Democratization & Corporatization of Media in Indonesia [...]

  2. [...] on “Media Concentration” section in this report, I generated several maps of media concentration below. The updated section can be downloadable [...]

  3. [...] on “Media Concentration” section in this report, I generated several maps of media concentration below. The updated section can be downloadable [...]

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